LinkedIn Recommendations For Your Job Hunt: Do They Help?

LinkedIn Recommendations For Your Job Hunt: Do They Help?

By: Tracy Levine, President, Advantage Talent, Inc.

Recently, I was forwarded an article about how Executives could get a job through LinkedIn.  One of the suggestions was to solicit recommendations for the hiring manager to read.  The observation was made that in the normal job situation you only get to provide a few recommendations but now with LinkedIn you can give the hiring manager even more positive recommendations to read.  The declaration made me laugh out loud.  Published studies show that the average hiring manager only looks at a resume for 10-15 seconds.  It flies in the face of logic to think that the hiring manager who only takes seconds to read a candidate’s resume is going to take even one second to read recommendations on LinkedIn.   Professional Executive Recruiters and HR Directors are tasked with asking specific questions that relate to the job at hand when calling a reference.  A short recommendation on LinkedIn isn’t even in the same league as a real recommendation and cannot be compared.

Some people have taken to attaching their LinkedIn recommendations to their resume. Most Executive Recruiters and hiring managers I have spoken with say they take recommendations on LinkedIn with a grain of salt.  Recommendations that are from people who have actually worked with the person or used a person’s services are the closest to real recommendations.  The problem with LinkedIn recommendations is that many people solicit recommendations from people who know them from social situations and networking but cannot speak to the person’s work experience.  Another problem is the “you give me a recommendation” and “I will give you a recommendation” situation.  Typically, these exchanges are not conducive to real or to meaningful recommendations.

Getting recommendations are great if you stick to only getting and giving recommendations to people you have personally worked with in a meaningful capacity.  However, no amount of recommendations can erase a checkered history.  It is the job of the Professional Recruiter or HR Director to do a thorough background check.

10 Rules of LinkedIn Group Etiquette

10 Rules of LinkedIn Group Etiquette

By: Tracy Levine, President, Advantage Talent, Inc.

1. Do not ask to join groups you are not qualified to join.  For example, if you do not qualify for the XYZ professional organization in the ‘real world’ then you don’t qualify in the LinkedIn world either.  Asking to join groups you are not qualified to join makes you appear to be a spammer.

2. Do not post job orders in the discussion section of the LinkedIn Group.  There is a job posting section…..Use it.  It may seem like everyone is looking for a job these days but many are not.

3.  Make sure to be relevant with your postings.  Don’t post just to post or to have your name everywhere. Make sure that the topics you chose are relevant to the group’s interests.   For example, if you are part of a LinkedIn wine group don’t post about your car collection. 

4.  Do not post inflammatory comments.  Most users of LinkedIn are established professionals.  They did not join the group to argue with you.  Also, posting inflammatory comments is a quick way to burn bridges in the professional community.

5.  Do not sell to members.  People do not join LinkedIn Groups just so you can have access to spam them with personal e-mails through LinkedIn.

6.  Do not, not, not post sale pitches for products in the Discussion Thread of a LinkedIn Group.  This is the quickest way to achieve negative brand recognition.

7. Do be a mentor.  Sharing your expertise with others and helping them reach their goals is appreciated by all.

8.  If you are the administrator of a group, check the requests to join often and frequently.

9.  Do not write anything that you do not want out in the public.  It may be a LinkedIn Group but it is not a confidential group.

10. DO NOT use the LinkedIn Groups as your personal blog.  This is my personal pet peeve and seems to be a growing trend in a couple of the LinkedIn Groups that I am a member.  Get your own blog, it’s cheap and it is free. (WordPress.com).  If members of a group find you interesting they can sign up to follow your blog.

Marketing Begins in the Past

We have all heard the following sayings.  “It’s a small world” and “Reputations take years to build and minutes to destroy.”  These truisms are particularly relevant for professionals working as independent contractors.  Today’s job will be tomorrow’s past job.   With these thoughts in mind, contractors increase their marketability by following a few simple rules.

 Make smooth transitions:  If you are offered a permanent job with another company, it is professional courtesy to give your current employer two weeks notice.

Keep the firm your are working through informed of any changes in the scope of the engagement or any changes in the political environment.  This is for your benefit so that the staffing firm you are working for can help you achieve your personal career goals and help mitigate any possible challenges in a changing environment. 

Document your current assignment duties and successes.  These are the heart of your resume.

Remember you were hired for your expertise.  Each day assess what problems you can solve to make the process smoother.

Be respectful of your immediate managers and peers.  Do not insert yourself into company politics.  You are a neutral party that has more to lose in the long by choosing sides.  No matter what the fight, it is not yours.  The people on both sides of a political issue are your references for your next career step.

 Avoid the appearance of handling personal business on company time.  No checking personal e-mails or excessive cell phone use.  The company is paying you by the hour and expects your full attention to the task at hand.

Even if you hate the assignment and cannot image working another day at the company, it is still important to give two weeks notice.  Contractors who just decide to not come in the next day create an image of irresponsibility and are not likely to be placed as quickly as the contractor who conducts business as a professional.  Always contact the staffing firm you are working through when difficulties arise.  They may be able to extricate you out of the situation sooner without burning bridges or may be able to help resolve the problem that is the cause of concern.

Please feel free to contact Tracy Levine, President, Advantage Talent, Inc. if you have further thoughts or questions.

CFOs Driving Corporate Growth

CFOs Driving Corporate Growth

By:  Michael Levine, Principal, Advantage Talent, Inc.

 

Many CFO’s ask me how to increase their job longevity.  There is only one answer to this question.  Expand job responsibilities beyond assuring the financial statements are presented on time.  The senior financial executive has to be actively involved in the growth of his or her company.

 

Through my CFO and Controller Roundtables and direct communication with many senior financial executives, I’ve learned about ways financial executives are driving the growth of their companies.  Examples that fuel the internal corporate growth engine include:

 

1      Utilizing a variety of financing vehicles to obtain additional liquidity.

2      Working with the executive team to develop sales professional compensation, which rewards salesmen for focusing on sales with greater profitability. 

3      Working with sales reps in the field when they encounter perceived internal corporate “red tape”.  In many cases, there are opportunities to streamline processes by easing overly restrictive controls or eliminating previously unidentified bureaucratic bottlenecks.

4      Initiating meetings with industry specific business strategists to provide guidance for growth.

5      Evaluating and improving health and other corporate insurance policies to attract and retain employees.

6      Developing tax strategies, which produce significant savings to free up cash for other productive uses.

7      Finding value in liabilities by taking aggressive stance on discounts by vendors, and getting rebates on credit cards, all of which provide cash for growth.

8      Relocating plant controllers to the factory floor vs.‘ivory tower’ offices.  This allows them to better see what is going on in real-time.  They are part of the floor team and therefore are more accessible to concerns which otherwise would not be communicated to the proper parties for action.

9      Negotiating with banks to reduce account and credit card fees.

10   Doing homework on competitive vendors and using information to achieve best pricing without necessity of changing vendors.

11   Securing State tax credits for software installation (training credit) and Federal Income payroll tax credits for certain geographic areas.

12   Developing strategies on timing of inventory purchases to balance tax reduction, holding costs, and pricing trends.

13   Working with the purchasing department to develop policies and procedures for inventory, supplies, and even capital expenditures to eliminate waste and maximize rebates.

14   Analyzing sales profitability by vendor, and subsequent vendor selection.

15   Analyzing sales profitability by customer, and subsequent ‘firing’ of certain customers.

16   Implementing travel and entertainment policy to maximize cash flow and eliminate waste.

 

Several CFOs are taking an outward focus and evaluating business opportunities that create competitive advantages.  Examples include:

1      Expanding current business territory to increase profitability with limited investment.

2      Creating a strategy and business plan to enter a new business sector.

3      Going on sales calls to better understand challenges being faced by sales reps in the field.  One such sales call resulted in development of a customer financing plan with an independent financing company which allows the customer to make payments over time, and also mitigates corporate A/R exposure, helps collect past due accounts and allows company to increase the size of customer orders.  As a result, finance is viewed as an asset to the sales team rather than an adversary. 

4      Investing strategically in IT (Information Technology) to improve customer experience when interacting with the company website, providing easy product catalog access, allowing customers to efficiently perform their own inquiries on product features, appearance, availability and secure order status updates. 

5      Creating online E-Commerce solution allowing customers to purchase directly online which provides for cost savings in customer service areas and improvement of customer satisfaction at the same time.

6      Selecting facility sites for maximum strategic advantage.

 

By taking on responsibilities that improve profitability and growth of the company, the senior financial executive should be able to better position his or herself for a long-term relationship with their current employer.  Come to one of the roundtable meetings and learn about what your peers are doing to drive growth in their companies.   Also, contact me with other questions or ideas at mlevine@advantagetalentinc.com.

Originally published in the CFO Advocate-The Newsletter for the CFO Roundtables.